The CFO'S Perspective

How Do I Let Go of an Underperforming CFO?

According to CFO.com the most common reasons for a CFO change are:

  1. As a follow-up move to a CEO change
  2. A voluntary decision to pursue a better opportunity
  3. To get the right personnel in place to take a growing company to the next level

The article goes on to say, “Finding out precisely how many finance leaders have been asked to take a hike in the wake of accounting fiascoes, earnings disappointments, failed mergers, or unsound investment decisions is trickier, since most of them are effectively silenced by generous severance packages.” While this article speaks directly to publicly traded companies, the same rationale holds true for private companies. We know that firing a CFO for performance-related reasons is by no means the most common reason for separating. However, it is difficult to pinpoint the percentage of companies that have let their CFO go due to underperformance because neither party is going to readily admit that was the reason for dismissal. However, it certainly happens. And when it does, the process poses a uniquely difficult scenario.

Firing an executive of any sort is a daunting task, but letting your CFO go provides an added host of challenges. Since companies task their CFO with the financial management of the company a CFO may possess critical financial knowledge and planning information that can be lost when they are terminated.

Topics: CFO Staffing HR Leadership Change Management Interim CFO Transition

Overcoming Supply Chain Difficulties – a CFO’s Perspective

Rapid growth in the US economy and the lingering impact of the pandemic on global supply chains have created problems for almost every industry.

The construction industry has been impacted by shortages of certain glues used to make composite building products leading to escalating construction costs and lengthy project delays.

The automotive industry has been impacted by the well-publicized shortage of computer chips, which is caused by the shortage of chip manufacturing capacity. Underlying causes include shortages of certain critical raw materials and a very small number of chip manufacturing equipment manufacturers.

Even restaurants have been hit with shortages of food containers for to-go orders because of shortages of natural gas feedstock for container manufacturers.

Nearly every business has been beset by delays in the delivery of everyday supplies that can be traced to a shortage of workers in the transportation and distribution industries.

There aren’t enough workers to load trucks at the warehouses or drive them down the highways. If essential supplies are available, they are likely to be higher-priced and available only with extended delivery dates.

Topics: Trends Supply Chain

Evaluating Supply Chain Options – Offshoring vs. Reshoring

Should we pursue foreign manufacturing operations?

The last two years have shown the fragility of foreign supply chains. What were once relatively stable supply chains are now fraught with problems ranging from logistics/shipping delays, government lockdowns, material shortages, labor shortages, and changing political environments leading to increased duties and tariffs.

How do we proceed from here?

To alleviate some global supply chain problems, do we onshore our foreign manufacturing operations back to the United States?

Or are we still interested in foreign markets with low labor costs?

Topics: Manufacturing Supply Chain

How a CFO Provides Decision Support

A large part of any Chief Financial Officer (CFO) role is strategic decision support, whether those decisions are related to staffing, pricing, selling, manufacturing, or any other area of the business. A CFO’s forward-looking point of view combined with their financial acumen makes them ideally suited to provide actionable information to their CEOs and other corporate decision makers and integral to the success of the organization.

Leaning on a CFO for strategic decision making support offers the following benefits:

Topics: CFO Planning Leadership CFO Responsibilities Strategy

How to Win the Talent War in Accounting and Finance

The war for talent that emerged amid The Great Resignation is still going strong in the areas of accounting and finance. As Hannah Green explains,

“The accounting sector has a problem with numbers. Specifically, it’s becoming harder and harder for firms to attract top talent. Why? There just aren’t enough talented bodies to go around. In what’s come to be known as the ‘war for talent’, top firms are finding it increasingly difficult to secure and retain highly qualified finance and accounting professionals.”

Topics: Recruiting Finance Accounting Hiring Staffing HR