The CFO'S Perspective

Kevin Briscoe

Kevin Briscoe

Kevin Briscoe’s professional career spans over 20 years in finance, accounting, and operations in publicly traded corporate and small closely held settings. Kevin excels in financial analyses and accounting operations, implementing internal controls, and creating and implementing organizational systems. He has held ownership and management positions, demonstrating an outstanding ability to provide effective leadership in increasing profitable growth throughout his career.

Recent Posts by Kevin Briscoe:

A Business Owner’s Perspective on Financial Statements

Don't ever let your business get ahead of the financial side of your business. Accounting, accounting, accounting. Know your numbers.” - Tilman J. Fertitta

When it comes to financial statements, one size definitely doesn't fit all. In fact, as your business grows and evolves, your financial statements should too. Their primary purpose shouldn't change, which is to provide business owners with actionable information. However, as a business matures, and potentially becomes more complex, with an increasing number of opportunities to pursue (or not) the statements need to be able to keep up.

There isn't a hard and fast rule about what you should look at, and at what stage those needs will vary. What should be true, however, is the owner's commitment and rigor around the process of what is reviewed and when. For businesses that lack the full-time need of a CFO, a part-time or project CFO will provide the expertise necessary to produce financial statements that are appropriate and relevant to generate information (not just data) that helps solve real business problems.

I happen to lead an organization made up of those financial executives and can offer that I face the same challenges you do when evaluating what I need to run the firm. Primarily, how do I make sure I have what I need to make good business decisions?

Topics: Financial Reports

5 Keys to Accurate Cash Flow Forecasting

Running out of cash is not only a sign of poor planning, but it's also one of the biggest reasons that businesses fail. Forecasting your company's cash flow can be tricky because of the many variables that determine how much cash you will need for operations versus the amount available.

Topics: Cash Flow Forecasting